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Blood at Crime Scenes

  • What you need to know when searching for a grave (Part 2)

    By: Jocelyne Terilli
    As we covered in Part 1, discovering a clandestine grave takes a well-thought out strategy with input from local officers and cadaver dog teams and the help of local citizens or police cadets to conduct the search. Your efforts and resources will pay off when you find the grave. But once you find it, what do you do next? Bryan Brendly, a Professor in the Biology Department and Forensic Institute at Guilford College and expert from our recent webinar, “Discovering & Documenting Clandestine...
  • Reinforcing Knowledge with Sirchie Webinars: One Police Department’s Story about “How to photograph blood with Bluestar or Luminol”

    By: Jocelyne Terilli
    Sirchie online training webinars can be an effective tool to reinforce your knowledge base and improve your skills.  Here’s one recent story. Tips about Investigating and Documenting Blood Evidence When you find blood evidence at a crime scene using the three-step method, you need to properly document and photograph it. Photographing evidence, especially blood evidence, is an important skill-set for crime scene investigators and law enforcement. Photographs can tell the story better with...
  • Searching for Blood: The 3-Step Method

    By: Jocelyne Terilli
    Blood is often one the most important pieces of evidence an investigator or lab technician can find. Whether at the crime scene or in the crime lab, there’s a three-step method that will help you work efficiently and thoroughly when searching for blood. This 3-step method involves: Search, Identify, and Enhance. Below, each method and the tools that will help you along the way are reviewed.  You will also find important tips to remember when you’re at the scene. Search: TIP: When...
  • How to photograph difficult scenes

    By: Jocelyne Terilli
    The likelihood of an ideal arson or crime scene to photograph are pretty slim. You’re often up against difficult conditions, while at the same time, it’s important to get clean and detailed, photos. It sounds impossible but we’re here to help. Below, we’ve covered five difficult scenes to photograph and the best practices to get that crisp image. On a side note, you first need to understand how each setting: shutter speed, aperture, ISO, and depth of field (DOF), in your camera works....
  • A Simplified Guide to Bloodstain Pattern Analysis

    By: Administrator
    Introduction Because  blood    behaves    according    to    certain    scientific    principles,    trained    bloodstain    pattern    analysts    can    examine    the    blood    evidence    left    behind    and    draw    conclusions    as    to    how    the    blood    may    have    been    shed.    From    what    may    appear    to    be    a    random  ...
  • International Association of Bloodstain Pattern Analysts – President’s Message

    By: Administrator
      I hope this finds everyone  well! As the summer gets underway I hope that everyone does all they can to get away from work to relax and spend valuable time with family and friends. There has been a change on the board of directors. Joe Slemko resigned from the position of Sergeant at Arms. After some consideration concerning the recommendation, I appointed Nicholas Paonessa as the new Sergeant at Arms. Nick has been present at every IABPA conference that I can recall....
  • UK Scientists make revolutionary forensic science breakthrough

    By: Administrator
      UK Scientist   Originally published in The Northern Echo A team of North-East scientists have made a breakthrough which is expected to revolutionize forensic science. Researchers at Teesside University have developed a way of detecting minute blood stains which would not be seen using current technology. They have also found a way of checking the age of blood stains - something which is regarded as a holy grail of forensic science. The failure to locate traces of blood during...
  • Enhancing of Blood Prints on Washed Clothing Using Luminol and LCV Reagents

    By: Administrator
    Thomas W. Adair and Rebecca L. Shaw Introduction: Luminol and LCV are commonly used reagents to develop latent bloodstains on evidence and at crime scenes. Luminol was first used to detect latent bloodstains in 1937 (1). Since that time the use of luminol has become very popular with many law enforcement agencies. The application of luminol creates a blue/green color chemiluminescence from its reaction with hemoglobin. Observation and subsequent documentation of latent bloodstain...
  • Blood Stain Terminology

    By: Administrator
    The Scientific Working Group on Bloodstain Pattern Analysis (SWGSTAIN) comprises bloodstain pattern analysis (BPA) experts from North America, Europe, New Zealand, and Australia. FBI Forensic Science Communications Originally Authored by: Scientific Working Group on Bloodstain Pattern Analysis (SWGSTAIN) Objective This document provides a recommended list of terms to use when teaching, discussing, writing, or testifying on bloodstain pattern analysis. Introduction The Scientific Working Group...
  • Detecting Blood Evidence After Bleaching

    By: Administrator
    Bleach Used to Clean Up Crime Scenes Originally from: ExploreForensics  http://www.exploreforensics.co.uk/ Chlorine bleaches can remove a bloodstain to the naked eye but fortunately, forensics experts can use the application of substances such as luminol or phenolphthalein to show that hemoglobin is present. Most people know that forensics involves many different kinds of evidence, whether that is blood evidence or a weapon. However, the evidence can become degraded from a number of things...
  • Written in Blood--Messages Crime Scene Investigators Find in Blood Spatter

    By: Administrator
    Blood Spatter Holds a Message for CSIs Blood spatter (often mistakenly called blood splatter) at the crime scene is a very valuable form of physical evidence. In the novel and later the motion picture, “The DaVinci Code,” a Harvard symbologist teams up with a French police cryptologist. The gist of the opening storyline is that the symbologist is called to a murder scene at the Louvre Museum since a note containing the name of this fellow was found on a murder victim. As the story...
  • Blood Spatter Training From U of WA

    By: Administrator
    The University of Australia offers a comprehensive program in Forensics. Using special permission, we are pleased to provide links to some of their outstanding training material on “Blood Spatter.” The University of Western Australia offers a comprehensive program in Forensics. Using special permission, we are pleased to provide links to some of their outstanding training material on “Blood Spatter.” What is Forensic Science: This document offers a good perspective overview of a topic...
  • Latent Blood Prints – Methods For Chemical Enhancement

    By: Administrator
    Latent blood prints at crime scenes may be developed with special chemicals to enhance clarity. This post list chemical formals for amido black, hungarian red and leuco crystal violet. Blood is often found on various surfaces at crime scenes where physical violence occurred. Therefore, blood acts as a transfer medium for latent fingerprints and shoeprints. On some occasions the blood residue retains enough color and detail to permit direct photographic recovery, but generally the blood marks...
  • How Police Find Latent Blood Prints

    By: Administrator
    Latent blood prints are often found at crime scenes but many times they lack detail. Several different chemical processes are available to enhance these prints permitting them to be photographed by crime scene investigators. Latent fingerprints, as described in earlier articles in this series, are fingerprints left at a crime scene that are not readily visible to the naked eye. But some crime scenes, especially those where physical violence has occurred, may harbor latent blood fingerprints and...
  • Blood Spatter: What Does it Tell The Blood Spatter Analyst

    By: Administrator
    A significant number of high profile criminal cases have been prosecuted when blood spatter evidence was included among the physical evidence. By: Don Penven The interpretation of blood spatter was first mentioned in a paper written in the 1890s by a researcher at the Institute for Forensic Medicine in Poland, Dr. Eduard Piotrowski. His work, "Concerning the Origin, Shape, Direction and Distribution of the Bloodstains Following Head Wounds Caused by Blows." But it took nearly 50 years before...