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  • Forensics Science and the Reality of Crime Scenes

    By: Administrator
    Edited By: Don Penven The crime scene tape had been rolled up and the forensic team is gone from the secluded, over grown slope in Washington, DC’s Rock Creek Park. Thirteen months had passed since the disappearance on May 1, 2001 of 24-year-old Chandra Levy, an intern with the Federal Bureau of Prisons, now her remains—a collection of bones, bits of clothing and a few personal effects had been moved to the office of the medical examiner. Authorities regret that her body had not been found...
  • NYPD Re-evaluates “Broken Windows” Tactic

    By: Administrator
    Edited By: Don Penven Following the death of a Staten Island man during his arrest by NYPD officers, City Council Member Meliaa Mark-Viverito, spoke to the media and a gathering of demonstrators demanding justice for the victim, Eric Garner. Garner died while in police custody after he was put into a chokehold. NYPD policy bans the use of chokeholds as a means of subduing a subject. Police reports show that Garner, 43, was approached by officers on suspicion of selling loose, untaxed cigarettes...
  • Erase or Obfuscate DNA--What Will They Think of Next

    By: Administrator
    From News Reports... Whatever will they think of next? This privacy spray promises to remove all traces of DNA DNA PLOT from surfaces - but could it be used to commit crimes without getting caught? Everywhere you go you run the risk of leaving traces of your DNA behind – from fingerprints, to skin, hair and cigarette butts. A Brooklyn-based firm is so concerned this DNA could be collected and stored by authorities it has created a range of sprays designed to help people delete it from all...
  • Using Skin Bacteria to Identify an Individual

    By: Administrator
    Don’t be fooled… some elements of society pay attention to TV news and Cop Shows, and thus the criminal element learns new tricks to prevent detection. Wearing gloves and covering up body hair are two of the most often used preventative measures, but according to Rob Knight, a microbial ecologist, bacteria on the hands may soon be replacing latent prints and DNA. Speaking at the a conference in Vancouver recently , Knight said that bacteria on your hands leave a "print" on a computer mouse...
  • Fingerprints give police new clues for solving crime

    By: Administrator
    Fingerprints give police new clues for solving crime By Rebecca Morelle Science reporter, BBC World Service Article Source and Introductory Video:  As darkness falls across the suburbs of Leeds, calls start to flood in to Chris Barley's radio from police HQ. It is prime time for criminal activity, and it is going to be a busy night for West Yorkshire's crime scene investigators too. A break-in has been reported nearby, and the forensic officer gets on his way. When you're gathering evidence at...
  • Collection of Glass Fragments at Crime/Accident Scenes

    By: Administrator
    COLLECTION OF GLASS FRAGMENTS California Dept. of Justice, Bureau of Forensic Services INTRODUCTION - The value of glass fragments as evidence is not always fully recognized. Windows, automobile glass, broken bottles, and other glass objects may be crucial evidence in burglaries, murders, hit-and-run and many other types of crime. It is known that any person standing in close proximity to glass when it is broken will pick up fragments of the broken glass, particularly on a subjects' clothing...
  • New Sirchie Latent Print Chemicals Webinar

    By: Andy Mariella
    Sirchie continues our online training webinar series with a new session on Basics of Latent Print Chemicals Thursday July 24, 2014 1-2 PM Eastern Standard Time.  We will review the fundamentals of working with chemicals to develop latent prints including demonstrations of working with ninhydrin. This webinar is provided free of charge for all registrants.  To register, please follow this link https://sirchie.clickwebinar.com/latent_print_chemicals/register Applying Ninhydrin to Evidence in...
  • Collection of Hair and Fiber Evidence

    By: Administrator
    COLLECTION OF FIBER AND HAIR EVIDENCE California Dept. of Justice, Bureau of Forensic Services INTRODUCTION Many crimes involve direct physical contact between victim and suspect. Whenever such contact occurs, there is frequently an inadvertent transfer of microscopic evidence. This evidence transfer is usually hairs and fibers. However, this type of evidence, which can be microscopic in form, may often be overlooked by investigating officers because it is not easily observed. Even though...
  • Basics of Latent Print Chemicals - Session 1

    By: Administrator
    Lumiscene Print Join Sirchie for our new webinar: "Basics of Latent Print Chemicals - Session 1" Thursday July 24, 2014,  1-2 PM Eastern Standard Time The use of chemical reagent to develop latent prints left behind during the commission of a crime is a common practice to help solve cases and identify the right suspect.  Executing the proper protocols in the right sequence is essential to ensuring the best results possible. This webinar provides the fundamentals for chemical use and...
  • Important New Research in Fingerprint Comparison

    By: Administrator
    UCLA News Fingerprint examination, though in use for more than 100 years, has until recently undergone surprisingly little scientific scrutiny. A paper recently published in the scientific journal PLOS ONE provides important new insight into what specific, visual aspects of fingerprint pairs make their analysis more or less difficult. The paper, authored by UCLA psychology professor Philip Kellman, UCLA Law professor Jennifer Mnookin and several additional co-authors, investigates one...
  • Law Enforcement Teams Up to Bring Down Drug Pipeline

    By: Administrator
    HUNTINGTON, W.Va. (WSAZ) -- Law enforcement agencies across the Tri-State are teaming up to disrupt the drug pipeline from Detroit. Recently, officers from Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia took part in a training course in Huntington. They learned about new tip-offs to look for in traffic stops and more about how they can work together to stop criminals from trucking in drugs. "Drug trafficking doesn't stop at the river over here, it goes across state lines," FBI Agent Chris Courtright...
  • Latent Print Processing Training at Kyle, TX

    By: Administrator
    With the  cooperation of the  Kyle Police  Dept.,  Sirchie is offering its comprehensive “hands-on” General Processing Class  at the  Kyle Police  Dept. August 5-7, 2014 Kyle Police Dept., 111 North  Front  Street, Kyle TX, 78640. This will be a Tuesday through Thursday, 8:30  am to 4:00  pm,  course that  covers state-of-the-art methods of identifying, recording, processing and  preserving various types of evidence found at the scene of the  crime. The program is geared...
  • Crime Scene Measurements

    By: Administrator
    By: Kent E. Boots, Forensic Magazine I often ask my students which device is more accurate, a Rolatape©, a steel tape, a handheld electronic measuring device, a total station, or a laser scanner. Ultimately that is a trick question. It is not that one device is more accurate than another. They all have the potential to measure accurately. It is just that each device measures with more precision than the previous device. Recently one of my students responded to the question with, “It depends...
  • Vehicles Pulled From Oklahoma Lake Contain Human Remains

    By: Administrator
    From Fox News/Associated Press Stories Custer Co., Oklahoma Sheriff Bruce Peoples confirmed that six bodies of people who were reported missing over 40 years ago have been recovered  from the county’s Foss lake. Peoples says that the families of the skeletal remains should get some amount of closure with this discovery. "Now the family will know, and that's what we look at as an important part of our job," Peoples said. "It's going to close a very unhappy chapter in their lives, but nothing...
  • New Advancements Are Being Made in Crime Scene Reconstruction

    By: Administrator
    Special Report: Technology in the Courts Daniel Meyer, Freelance Reporter - Buffalo Law Journal Thanks in large part to technological advancements and the changing role of forensic science in the criminal justice arena, crime scene reconstruction continues to play an instrumental role in the criminal investigative process. Advancements and improvements technologically are helping bring a greater knowledge of the series of events that surround the commission of a crime through the use of...