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  • Evidence Guides-State Agencies

    By: Administrator
    Evidence Collection Guides From Various States Arkansas: http://www.crime-scene-investigator.net/ARtraceevidencequalitymanual.pdf Connecticut: http://www.crime-scene-investigator.net/evidence_guidelines_CT.pdf Illinois: http://www.crime-scene-investigator.net/evidence_packaging_IL.pdf Missouri: http://www.crime-scene-investigator.net/forensic_evidence_manual_MO.pdf Montana: http://www.crime-scene-investigator.net/evidencecollectionmanual_MT.pdf New Jersey:...
  • Bludgeon Defense: Defensive Tactics Technique

    By: Administrator
    Watch and listen as Defensive Tactics instructor Richard Nance discusses ways to defend yourself from an attack with an impact or "bludgeon" weapon, and doing so without getting a broken arm... or cranium.  Street Survival! Bludgeon Defense Video Sign Up For the Latest News from Sirchie & the Forensics Industry
  • New Latent Print Chemicals - Working with Iodine Webinar

    By: Andy Mariella
    Join us for a new Sirchie webinar "Latent Print Chemicals - Working with Iodine" Wednesday August 27, 2014 from 1-2 PM Eastern Standard Time.  Learn the basics of working with chemicals to develop latent prints as we take a deeper dive on working with iodine. Register now: https://sirchie.clickwebinar.com/iodine/register
  • Developing Latent Prints from Gloves

    By: Administrator
    Latent Print Daniel J. Rinehart/Crime Scene Investigator Network Case #1: Developing and Identifying a Latent Print Recovered from a Piece of Latex Glove Using Ninhydrin-Heptane Carrier Developing suitable ridge detail on the interior side of surgical type gloves is infrequent and identifying recovered ridge detail is even more unusual. Thanks to the research and publication of the work done by Jason Pressly of the Mississippi Crime Laboratory, I had the benefit of having another option in...
  • A Simplified Guide to Digital Evidence

    By: Administrator
    Introduction to Digital...
  • Nano-sized chip detects explosives

    By: Administrator
    Improvised Explosive Device Nano-sized chip picks up scent of explosives molecules better than dog's nose A groundbreaking nanotechnology-inspired sensor picks up the scent of explosives molecules better than a detection dog's nose. The device is mobile, inexpensive, and highly accurate, detecting explosives in the air at concentrations as low as a few molecules per 1,000 trillion. Existing explosives sensors are expensive, bulky and require expert interpretation of the findings. Seurity...
  • A Simplified Guide to Bloodstain Pattern Analysis

    By: Administrator
    Introduction Because  blood    behaves    according    to    certain    scientific    principles,    trained    bloodstain    pattern    analysts    can    examine    the    blood    evidence    left    behind    and    draw    conclusions    as    to    how    the    blood    may    have    been    shed.    From    what    may    appear    to    be    a    random  ...
  • Cyber forensics: tips from a detective’s playbook

    By: Administrator
    By: Jayne Friedland Holland Editor's Note: No entity is immune from cyber-attack... least of all law enforcement agencies. The tips here were originally created for use by corporate IT departments, but this same information may be relevant for internal use by government investigative agencies. You approach the scene, taking the first steps to determining what happened and how to prevent it in the future. Following your training, you secure the area, conduct a scan of the scene, take photos to...
  • New training methods for bomb-sniffing dogs.

    By: Administrator
    By; Don Penven The U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) was determined to discover what sort of materials would best mimic the odor of C-4 plastic explosives to be used in training bomb-sniffing dogs. DoD awarded a four-year contract to a research team provided by Indiana-Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) designed to assist in training these animals. Surprisingly… they learned that dogs react best to actual C-4, which calls into question the use of substitutes that were currently in use as...
  • Forensics, DNA Fingerprinting, and CODIS

    By: Administrator
    Forensics, DNA Fingerprinting, and CODIS DNA Trace By: Karen Norrgard, Ph.D. (Write Science Right) © 2008 Nature Education, Citation: Norrgard, K. (2008) Forensics, DNA fingerprinting, and CODIS. Nature Education 1(1):35 How ethical is it to keep a database of convicted felons' DNA profiles? Can we rely on DNA fingerprints for conviction? Many ethical issues surround the use of DNA in forensic technology. DNA is present in nearly every cell of our bodies, and we leave cells behind everywhere...
  • Scientist and National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Discredit Comparative Bullet Lead Analysis (CBLA)

    By: Administrator
    When Joe Louis Dansby, 61, of Redland in Nevada County, was convicted in 1997 of capital double homicide in the 1992 shooting deaths of a Nevada County couple, the forensic tool known as “Comparative Bullet Lead Analysis” was widely accepted as a valid evidentiary science, which played a key role in Dansby's conviction. By Ken McLemore, Hope Star Editor Based upon testimony by FBI Forensic Analyst Kathleen Lundy, spent bullet leads which were recovered from the victims were supposedly...
  • DNA fingerprinting pioneer Jeffreys honored by oldest science award

    By: Administrator
    By Jonathan Webb, Science reporter, BBC News The inventor of genetic fingerprinting has been awarded the world's oldest science prize, Prof. Sir Alec Jeffreys the Royal Society's Copley Medal. In 1984, Prof Sir Alec Jeffreys stumbled on a method for distinguishing individuals based on their DNA. It was a discovery that went on to transform forensic science and resolve questions of identity and kinship. He receives the medal "for his pioneering work on variation and mutation in the human...
  • John Jay College Offers The Arson Screening Project

    By: Administrator
    The Center for Modern Forensic Practice John Jay College of Criminal Justice 524 West 59th. Street New York, NY, 10019 A 2002 compilation by the Bureau of Justice Statistics (a study that surveyed only half of the states) counted over 5,000 prisoners serving arson sentences. At least a dozen arson convictions have generated death sentences. There is no question that many of these arson convictions and sentences rest on false science: that many “arsons” were accidents. The Innocence...
  • How Today's Car Thieves Can Open Your Vehicle Without Ever Touching It

    By: Administrator
    Aug. 5, 2014   Elizabeth Kreft    Think thieves rely just on brute force to steal the goods you’ve stored in your car or trunk?  Think again. At the Black Hat security conference later this week, Silvio Cesare, an Australian researcher for the security firm Qualys, plans to reveal a technique that could allow someone with a bit of hacking no-how to spoof the signal from a wireless key fob and unlock a car with no physical trace, using a codebreaking attack that takes as little as a...
  • Federal review stalls after finding forensic errors by FBI lab

    By: Administrator
    By Spencer S. Hsu July 29  Washington Post Nearly every criminal case reviewed by the FBI and the Justice Department as part of a massive investigation started in 2012 of problems at the FBI lab has included flawed forensic testimony from the agency, government officials said. The findings troubled the bureau, and it stopped the review of convictions last August. Case reviews resumed this month at the order of the Justice Department, the officials said. U.S. officials began the inquiry after...